Book Talk with Megan Bever- At War With King Alcohol: Debating Drinking and Masculinity in The Civil War

At War with King Alcohol explores the ways that Civil War soldiers used liquor and examines the societal debates that grew out of their uses. The study looks at liquor’s medicinal uses during the war, broadens out to soldiers’ drinking habits, and ultimately focuses on the ways that society tried

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Old Abe

Old Abe Wisconsin’s War Eagle

Old Abe, an icon in Wisconsin Civil War history was an American bald eagle who served with the Eighth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He participated in over 30 battles, narrowly avoiding wounds on several occasions. During the war, he became a rallying point to Union troops and an anathema to

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Book Talk – Such Anxious Hours: Wisconsin Women’s Voices from the Civil War

The Wisconsin Veterans Museum welcomes Jo Ann Carr to talk about her 2019 work Such Anxious Hours, which details the letters and diaries of Wisconsin women who took care of the homes, farmsteads, and families while their spouses were off fighting during the Civil War. Jo Ann will highlight the

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March Madness 2021

Here's the Big Hairy Deal you’ve been waiting for. The Wisconsin Veterans Museum March Madness Beards vs Mustaches Tournament begins. From March 15th until April 3rd the finest Wisco whiskers will face off each weekday. You, our loyal fans, will determine the finest facial hair in the collection by giving

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Suffrage Through Service: How Military Service Expanded Voting Rights

By Russell Horton Reference Archivist Throughout U.S. history, men and women in the military have risked their lives to protect the civil rights we enjoy as citizens. Beyond protection, their brave service has also affected some of those rights over the past 150 years. In particular, military service has changed

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featured 1864 graphic

Origins of Absentee Voting

By Russell Horton Reference Archivist …justice seems to demand that they should be rewarded in a different manner for their patriotism than by a loss of the most important right of citizenship. – Governor Edward Salomon When the Civil War began in April 1861, many people thought it would be

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Month of the Military Child: Augustus Patchin and Family

By Russell Horton, Reference & Outreach Archivist  The Wisconsin Veterans Museum focuses on preserving the stories of men and women who serve in the US military. But very often, in the letters, photographs, and objects from those veterans, we can learn much of the families and children who remained home,

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Rearguard at Gettysburg

By Kevin Hampton, Curator of History On the afternoon of July 1, 1863, the 7th Wisconsin played a pivotal role as the rear guard of the Union Army during the retreat through the town of Gettysburg. Though the regiment held their position as long as possible along a rail fence

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Poetry and Proverbs

By Russell Horton, Reference Archivist “If I die a prisoner of war, I would like to have this diary sent to my Father, A. Ingersoll, Waupun, Wis.” -Frank J. Ingersoll, Diary Entry, ca. September 1864 In the first two years of the Civil War, soldiers from either side of the

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Here Lies Lieutenant Wemple

By Gregory Krueger, Curator of Exhibits At the start of the Civil War, Union forces were under the command of Winfield Scott. Scott, an old Army veteran, outlined a plan to defeat the southern states based upon the premise of a naval blockade of southern ports. Hoping to suffocate Southern

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